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Knowledge Base| Dual Extruder 3D Printer: What You Need to Know

3D printer that utilized Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) in the early days only had just a single extruder, which meant that the individual might only print in one material at the time.
 
In recent years, dual extrusion has actually arisen. With a 2nd nozzle and extruder, makers now have the opportunity to make 3D prints composed of two different materials.
 
The procedure of printing with dual extruders coincides as it is with "typical" FDM 3D printers. The only distinction is that the 3D printer instantly switches over between filaments at specific times. In this article, we'll see why this variation of technology is becoming much widely spread.
 
There are lots of benefits that come with dual extrusion 3D printing.
 
Supports
From a functionality perspective, possibly the most considerable is the ability to integrate a basic material with quickly dissolvable support material. This is very helpful since not only does it remove the demand to remove supports, it also makes certain that no support marks are left on the final 3D print.
 
One of the most preferred dissolvable filaments used for support structures are PVA as well as COMPLETION. PVA liquefies in water while HIPS dissolves in limonene.
 
Colors
An obvious benefit of dual extrusion 3D printing is the ability to publish in two various colors if you're interested in visual appeals. If you require different regions of a print to stand out from one another, this will help a lot. Examples might include educational versions in anatomical or automobile areas.
 
Structure
Other usage situation we'll point out here is the opportunity to reinforce material with a tougher one. For instance, one nozzle might publish most of a print out of PLA while the other prints just specific areas using a carbon-fiber-based filament. In this way, the last print can be a lot stronger.
 
Drawbacks
There aren't numerous downsides to using a dual extrusion 3D printer, the major ones being cost and maintenance. A dual extrusion 3D printer usually costs more than its closest single extrusion equivalent. As well as this, you'll naturally need to purchase a second filament.
 
3D printer parts do not last permanently. They require treatment and replacement every once in a while. With a 2nd nozzle and extruder, the opportunity of hotend issues is essentially doubled. You're likely to need to make certain that both are flawlessly calibrated.
 
Dual Extrusion 3D Printers Recommended
Many dual extrusion 3D printers available on the market today actually may be tricky to choose which one is the best for your needs.
 
One of the market's favorite, cost-effective dual extruder 3D printers is the Creality CR-X. What's particularly fascinating about this machine is that it only has one nozzle. Two filaments enter the print head via a "Y-splitter", which combines both materials and also deposits a single strand. That suggests it has the option to print in one, the other, or a mix of both filaments. Normally, the two filaments will need to have comparable temperature needs. For this attribute, along with a decently large develop volume, you'll be paying around $750.
 
Final Remarks
Dual extrusion 3D printing is a valuable and also useful area of additive manufacturing. Thanks to the wide range of multi-material devices, there are several methods to make full use of the technique.
 
At present, the costs for dual extrusion 3D printers are still reasonably high. Nonetheless, there are a few printers that offer dual extrusion for under $1000, such as the Flashforge Creator Pro, which is wonderful. If, however, purchasing a brand-new machine isn't something you're interested in, choices for DIY add-ons exist as well.
 
It will be exciting to see where multi-material 3D printing will enter the following couple of years. One point's for certain: With printers like the CR-X showing up on the marketplace, dual extrusion is gradually making its way into more cost-effective 3D printers.